Burj Al Arab


Burj Al Arab [www.ritemail.blogspot.com]
Burj Al Arab [www.ritemail.blogspot.com]
Burj Al Arab [www.ritemail.blogspot.com]Dubai is incomparable. Blessed with sunshine 350 days a year, the town is situated right off the beautiful coast of the warm Arabian Gulf. Tourists from all over the world relax along the natural, golden beaches. They indulge in exquisite restaurants and chic bars, play tennis and golf or test their equestrian skills.
The world's top athletes compete in Dubai for the highest prize money in their disciplines. And all well-known, international companies reside in one of the architecturally unique and exciting skyscrapers in the heart of the pulsating metropolis. People with different cultures and religions living together in harmony, a cosmopolitan culture, dynamic economy, the highest infrastructural standards as well as a fantastic quality of life and literally no crime whatsoever - that's Dubai.
Dubai is simply unique!
Burj Al Arab [www.ritemail.blogspot.com]
Burj Al Arab [www.ritemail.blogspot.com]
Burj Al Arab [www.ritemail.blogspot.com]
Burj Al Arab [www.ritemail.blogspot.com]
Burj Al Arab [www.ritemail.blogspot.com]
Burj Al Arab [www.ritemail.blogspot.com]
Burj Al Arab [www.ritemail.blogspot.com]
Burj Al Arab [www.ritemail.blogspot.com]
Burj Al Arab [www.ritemail.blogspot.com]
Burj Al Arab [www.ritemail.blogspot.com]In preparation for the Dubai Duty Free Men's Open, tennis legend, Andre Agassi and the world No. 1, Roger Federer, couldn't resist the temptation to have a friendly knock about on the world's highest tennis court, the helipad of Burj Al Arab, the world's most luxurious hotel. Both players are in Dubai to compete in the US$1 million Dubai Duty Free Men's Open, which is the first round of the two-week Dubai Tennis Championships.

sunsets over Europe

Ash sky.

Volcanic Ash Sunset

Volcanic sunset    Sunset 1

Sunset with volcanic dust

IMG_3693


Palm Tree Island


Photograph by Hashim/Getty Images
Palm Tree Island is a family friendly getaway reached by a ten-minute boat ride from Doha . The island is lined with beaches, pools, and other water sports facilities.

Statue of Liberty


Photograph by Kathleen Campbell/Stone/Getty Images
The Statue of Liberty has kept watch over New York Harbor since 1886. Visitor access to the crown's observation windows, however, has been closed since September 11, 2001.

Dubai

Photograph by Neil Emmerson/Getty Images
Dubayy ( Dubai ) is the chief port of the United Arab Emirates —a federation of seven Arabian Peninsula sheikhdoms. Oil provides a healthy GDP similar to that of prosperous western European nations.

Switzerland


Photograph by James P. Blair
The pastoral beauty of the Swiss Alps invites visitors to explore field and crag at a leisurely pace.

Portugal


Prague Castle


Prague Castle (Czech: Pražský hrad) is a castle in Prague where the Czech kings, Holy Roman Emperors and presidents of Czechoslovakia and the Czech Republic have had their offices. The Czech Crown Jewels are kept here. Prague Castle is one of the biggest castles in the world (according to Guinness Book of Records the biggest ancient castle [1]) at about 570 meters in length and an average of about 130 meters wide.

History

The history of the castle stretches back to the 9th century (870). The first walled building was the church of Our Lady[2]. The Basilica of Saint George and the Basilica of St. Vitus were founded in the first half of the 10th century. The first convent in Bohemia was founded in the castle, next to the church of St. George. A Romanesque palace was erected here during the 12th century. In the 14th century, under the reign of Charles IV the royal palace was rebuilt in Gothic style and the castle fortifications were strengthened. In place of rotunda and basilica of St. Vitus began building of a vast Gothic church, that have been completed almost six centuries later. During the Hussite Wars and the following decades the Castle was not inhabited. In 1485, King Ladislaus II Jagello began to rebuild the castle. The massive Vladislav Hall (built by Benedikt Rejt) was added to the Royal Palace. There were also built new defence towers on the northern side of the castle. A large fire in 1541 destroyed large parts of the castle. Under the Habsburgs some new buildings in renaissance style appeared here. Ferdinand I built Belvedere, summer palace for his wife Anne. Rudolph II used Prague Castle as his main residence. He founded the northern wing of the palace, with the Spanish Hall, where his precious artistic collections were exhibited. The Second Prague defenestration in 1618 began the Bohemian Revolt. During the subsequent wars the Castle was damaged and dilapidated. Many works from the collection of Rudolph II were looted by Swedes in 1648, in the course of the Thirty Years' War. The last major rebuilding of the castle was carried out by Queen Maria Theresa in the second half of the 18th century. Ferdinand V, after abdication in 1848, chose Prague Castle as his home

Lowenburg Castle



Within the Wilhelmshöhe Hill Park which sits on one end of the city of Kassel, there stands what appears to be a medieval castle. However, the Löwenburg or "Lion's Castle" was ordered to be built by the Landgrave Wilhelm IX from Hessen Kassel (1743 -1821) (later he gained the higher title of Elector Wilhelm I - Kurfürst Wilhelm I), the Walt Disney of his era, over a period of eight years between 1793 and 1801 as a romantic ruin. It was carfelully designed by his royal court building inspector Heinrich Christoph Jussow (1754 – 1825) who had been trained as an architect and construction project manager in France, Italy, and England, and who had gone to England specifically to study romantic English ruins and draw up a plan for the Landgrave's garden folly. Today scholars regard Löwenburg Castle ruins as one of the most significant buildings of its genre, in addition to being one of the first major neo-Gothic buildings in Germany.
What the Landgrave did here was the eighteenth century equivalent of Disney World Tokyo. It is a central element of the Wilhlemshöhe castle park which, starting in 1785, the Landgrave transformed into a landscaped garden modeled on the English pattern, and filled with themed areas – fake Roman aquaducts, fake English Castle Ruins, fake Grecian temples, and even a fake Chinese Village. In terms of sheer monumental size, however, the fake monumental castle ruin of the Löwenburg stands apart from the numerous antiquated and pseudo-medieval constructions that served as decorative motifs for landscaped parks in other parts of Europe. Via Link 

Dubai Bus


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Malbork


The Castle in Malbork (German: Die Marienburg, Polish: Zamek w Malborku) was built in Prussia by the Teutonic Order as an Ordensburg. The Order named it Marienburg, literally "Mary's Castle". The town which grew around it was also named Marienburg, but since 1945 it is again, after 173 years, part of Poland and known as Malbork.

The castle is a classic example of a medieval fortress, and is the world's largest brick gothic castle. UNESCO listed the castle and its museum as World Heritage Sites in December 1997 as Castle of the Teutonic Order in Malbork. It is one of two World Heritage Sites in the region with origins in the Teutonic Order. The other is the Medieval Town of Torun, founded in 1231 as the site of the castle Thorn (Torun).
The castle was founded in 1274 by the Teutonic Order during their government of Prussia and is located on the Southeastern bank of the river Nogat. It was named Marienburg after the Virgin Mary, patron saint of the Order.

The Order had been based in Acre, but when this last stronghold of the Crusades fell, the Order had to move its headquarters to Venice. In 1309, in the wake of both the papal persecution of the Knights Templar as well as the Teutonic takeover of Danzig, the Order under Siegfried von Feuchtwangen moved its headquarters into the Prussian part of their monastic state. They chose the Marienburg, conveniently located on the Nogat, in the Vistula Delta, which allows access by ship.

The castle was expanded several time to host the growing number of Knights, and became the largest fortified Gothic building in Europe, featuring several sections and walls. It consists of three separate sections - the High, Middle and Lower Castles, separated by multiple dry moats and towers. The castle once housed approximately 3,000 "brothers in arms", and the outermost castle walls enclose 52 acres (210,000 m²), four times larger than the enclosed space of Windsor Castle.

The favourable position of the castle on the river Nogat and its relatively flat surrounding allowed for easy access by barges and trading ships, from the Vistula and the Baltic Sea. During their governance, the Teutonic Knights collected river tolls on passing ships, as did other castles along the rivers, imposing a monopoly on the trade of amber. When the city became a member of the Hanseatic League, many Hanseatic meetings were held at Marienburg castle
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